Baïkal is a quite popular Calendar+Contacts server. It supports CalDAV as well as CardDAV.

I’ve been using it for my calendars and adressbooks already for more than 4 years now. However, I initially installed it as plain PHP application with a MySQL database. The developers also announced quite early, that they are working on a Docker image, but there is nothing useful as of mid 2018. So far they just provide a quite inconvenient how-to and a list of issues that apparently prevent them from providing a proper Docker image. Thus, I just dockerised the application myself :)

The Docker image

Actually, creating a Docker image for Baïkal was super easy. In the end, it is “only” a PHP application ;-) The corresponding Dockerfile can be found in the root directory of Baïkal’s git repository (at least in my fork). The latest version at the time of writing is:

FROM php:apache
MAINTAINER martin scharm <https://binfalse.de/contact>

# we're working from /var/www, not /var/www/html
# the html directory will come with baikal
WORKDIR /var/www

# install tools necessary for the setup
RUN apt-get update \
 && apt-get install -y -q --no-install-recommends \
    unzip \
    git \
    libjpeg62-turbo \
    libjpeg62-turbo-dev \
    libpng-dev \
    libfreetype6-dev \
    ssmtp \
 && apt-get clean \
 && rm -r /var/lib/apt/lists/* \
 && a2enmod expires headers

# for mail configuration see https://binfalse.de/2016/11/25/mail-support-for-docker-s-php-fpm/


# install php db extensions
RUN docker-php-source extract \
 && docker-php-ext-configure gd --with-freetype-dir=/usr/include/ --with-jpeg-dir=/usr/include/ \
 && docker-php-ext-install -j$(nproc) pdo pdo_mysql \
 && docker-php-source delete

# install composer
RUN php -r "copy('https://getcomposer.org/installer', 'composer-setup.php');" \
 && php -r "if (hash_file('SHA384', 'composer-setup.php') === '544e09ee996cdf60ece3804abc52599c22b1f40f4323403c44d44fdfdd586475ca9813a858088ffbc1f233e9b180f061') { echo 'Installer verified'; } else { echo 'Installer corrupt'; unlink('composer-setup.php'); } echo PHP_EOL;" \
 && mkdir -p composer/packages \
 && php composer-setup.php --install-dir=composer \
 && php -r "unlink('composer-setup.php');" \
 && chown -R www-data: composer


# prepare destination
RUN rm -rf /var/www/html && chown www-data /var/www/
ADD composer.json /var/www/
ADD Core html /var/www/Core/
ADD html /var/www/html/

# install dependencies etc
USER www-data
RUN composer/composer.phar install


USER root

# the Specific dir is supposed to come from some persistent storage
VOLUME /var/www/Specific

So, it basically

  • installs some dependencies through apt-get,
  • installs the PDO-MySQL extension,
  • installs composer,
  • adds the Baikal sources into the image,
  • and finally installs remaining Baikal dependencies through composer.

I distribute the image as binfalse/baikal.

Using the Docker image

Using the image is fairly simple. Basically, you only need to mount some persistent space to /var/www/Specific

docker run -it --rm -p 80:80 -v /path/to/persistent:/var/www/Specific binfalse/baikal

Please make sure that the directory /path/to/persistent has proper permissions. In the container an Apache2 is serving the contents, so make sure the user www-data (UID 33) is allowed to rwx that directory.

To start with, you can use the original Specific directory from the Baïkal repository. Then head to your Baikal instance (which will probably redirect to BASEURL/admin/install), and setup your server. Every configuration will be stored in the mounted volume at /path/to/persistent.

SSL

To support encrypted connections you would need to mount the certificates as well as a modified Apache configuration into the container. However, I recommend to run it behind a reverse proxy, such as binfalse/nginx-proxy, and let the proxy handle all SSL connections (as for all other containers). This way, you just need one proper SSL configuration.

MySQL

The default SQLite database is perfect for a first test, but is slow and just allows for a limited amount of SQL variables. If you for example have more than 999 contacts, the first sync of a clean WebDAV device will result in an exception such as:

PDOException: SQLSTATE[HY000]: General error: 1 too many SQL variables

Thus, for production you may want to switch to a proper database, such as MariaDB. Lucky you, the Docker image supports MySQL! ;-)

To reproducibly assemble both containers, I recommend Docker-Compose. Here is a sample config with two containers baikal and baikal-db:

version: '2'
services:
    baikal:
        restart: always
        image: binfalse/baikal
        container_name: baikal
        volumes:
            - /srv/baikal/config:/var/www/Specific
        links:
            - baikal-db
    baikal-db:
        restart: always
        image: mariadb
        container_name: baikal-db
        volumes:
            - /srv/baikal/database:/var/lib/mysql
        environment:
            MYSQL_ROOT_PASSWORD: roots-difficult-password
            MYSQL_DATABASE: baikal
            MYSQL_USER: baikal
            MYSQL_PASSWORD: baikals-difficult-password

This assumes, that your Baikal configuration can be found in /srv/baikal/config. The database will be stored in /srv/baikal/database. Also note the database credentials for configuring Baikal. If you’re not running a reverse proxy in front of the application, you also need to add some port forwarding for the baikal container:

version: '2'
services:
    baikal:
        restart: always
        image: binfalse/baikal
        [...]
        ports:
            - "80:80"
            - "443:443"
        [...]

Mail support

I’m not sure why, but Baikal’s list of issues included support for mail. However, adding mail support should also be fairly easy if needed. I already wrote a How-To for PHP-mail in Docker.


Martin Scharm

stuff. just for the records.


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